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    Peter Bordenave / The Mainstream

Sexual assault awareness — it’s more than a month; it’s a journey

in Campus Life by

Although Sexual Assault Awareness Month has ended, sexual violence continues to live on. According to the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network, “Every 98 seconds, another American is sexually assaulted.” New sex trends like “stealthing,” which most experts agree could be considered sexual assault, mean the topic still needs to be studied.

While no laws currently exist that would deem this trend illegal in the U.S., stealthing is a “clear sexual offense” in the U.K., and in Switzerland a man was convicted of rape after performing this act according to the Huffington Post.

If you haven’t heard of the new sex trend known as stealthing, the act “involves men secretly taking off their condoms during consensual sex,” as defined by USA Today in an article released last month.

The Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act of 2013 states, “Most higher education institutions — including community colleges and vocational schools — must educate students, faculty and staff on the prevention of rape, domestic acquaintance rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.” This is why during the last week of April, UCC administration sent all full-time students emails that introduced online training videos through SafeColleges as required by the Campus Sexual Violence Act or “SaVE Act.”

Students can call (800) 434-0154 or email marjan.coester@umpqua.edu with any questions regarding the online training courses sent to their student email accounts. Students have the option of whether or not to take these online training courses, as clarified in a later email sent out by UCC. Whether or not this training covers stealthing, students should be aware of the trend in order to better protect themselves.

Two events were brought to UCC in April to help students participate in raising awareness about sexual assault.

The first, Denim Day USA, involved wearing denim, specifically jeans, on April 26 to protest against “erroneous and destructive attitudes about sexual assault.”

The second, Red My Lips, began as an idea in an email from ASUCC Activities Officer, Cinthia Rojas, to the UCC Social Justice League club organizer, KC Perley.

Red My Lips is an international nonprofit organization that focuses on raising awareness on sexual violence and other areas related to it such as victim blaming.  Red My Lips states on their website, “Our approach includes promoting both survivor support and culture change.”

“During the month of April, you wear bright red lipstick to support those who’ve gone through the struggle of sexual violence,” Perley explained, “The point of Red My Lips isn’t about vanity; it’s about visibility. When you see someone wearing bright red lipstick, it sparks a conversation.”

The Social Justice League was able to pass out between 20 to 30 tubes of red lipstick to students, faculty and staff in the Student Center. “Even though we only got so many people to do it, it still sparked some really, really great important conversations.”

UCC’s Title IX Coordinator, Lynn Johnson, can also be contacted at (541) 440-7690 with questions and concerns and to learn more about options for campus reporting. Students also have the option of visiting Title IX’s website at www.campus.oregonsatf.org for more information.

sexual assualt poster
Campaign posters located in RiverHawk Central recognize Denim Day USA.
Kaya Maliglig / The Mainstream