Accreditors mark accommodation, recommendations UCC was up for its mid-cycle evaluation report in April. This report falls in between the college’s normal seven-year accreditation cycle and acts as a pre-evaluation so that UCC is ready for the next accreditation evaluation in four years. Accreditors spoke to significant UCC individuals and groups on April 18 and 19 about some of the main points of the accreditation report. Four issues of concern included new strategic plans, shared governance ambiguity and incomplete assessment practices. The accreditors reviewed the college’s mission and core themes, human resources and leadership throughout the college. Director of Assessment and Accreditation Emily Fiocco sharedRead More →

Dan Habibi, filmmaker of the documentary “Intelligent Lives” knows that people with intellectual disabilities are the most segregated of all Americans. “Only 17 percent of students with intellectual disabilities are included in regular education. Just 40 percent will graduate from high school. And of the 6.5 million Americans with intellectual disability, barely 15 percent are employed,” Habibi says. “People with disabilities number over 288,000 as of 2017 in the state of Oregon. Only 37.8%, or 109,027 of those with disabilities are employed.” — Oregon Study of Health & Disability His documentary “Intelligent Lives” was shown at UCC on April 23, sponsored partly by Les Rogers,Read More →

“It’s Not You It’s Me” features work by UCC students Angle Mae Bioy, Jayden Dukes, Colleen Jackson, Lillian Meier, and Serena Swanson. The work looks to express and explore the variety of ways that they view themselves internally as well as how they feel about the way the world views them. There is also a portion of work that goes beyond this idea and is more of an embodiment of themselves. The artists describe their work. The work can be seen at the Umpqua Valley Arts Association starting May 17. The opening reception will be from five until seven in the evening. The show willRead More →

“May the force be with you, always.” UCC is celebrating Star Wars day Friday, May 3 by preparing Star Wars themed food in the cafeteria and giving away prizes in the LaVerne Murphy Student Center building from 11 a.m to 1 p.m. Students are celebrating the occasion by wearing their Star Wars apparel to campus. If you missed the event on campus, many deals can be found online that may interest fans or maybe people looking for something for Mother’s Day (if mom is a Star Wars fan). The official Star Wars website links to many different vendors offering deals on Star Wars themed apparelRead More →

UCC student Cody Phillips’s car was stolen from the UCC campus Friday, April 26. Phillips left his blue Honda in the UCC parking lot, west of the Whipple center, just before 11 a.m. After he and fellow student Zach Schissler put their backpacks with laptops inside. He returned shortly at around noon to discover his 1994 Civic Hatchback and his valuables inside were nowhere to be found. After searching the surrounding parking lot, Phillips contacted the police and UCC security to report the missing car. UCC security was unable to find any evidence from campus security surveillance tapes of how the car was stolen. TheRead More →

Umpqua Community College and Umpqua Valley Arts Association have partnered with the Ford Family Foundation and the Hallie Ford Museum of Art to present the Hallie Ford Fellows Exhibition “What Needs To Be Said.” The exhibition features a presentation at both UCC and UVAA, and the work can be viewed at both venues until May 8, 2019. An artist panel was held March 15 at Centerstage Theatre in the Whipple Arts Building as part of the opening reception. During this time, Susan Rochester, Fine Arts department chair, asked the three artists in attendance, Karl Burkheimer, Samantha Wall, and Blair Saxon-Hill, various questions about their workRead More →

The Jordan Cove Energy Project is a proposal by Canadian-based energy company Pembina to install a 234-mile long pipeline across Oregon that will transport liquified natural gas, more commonly known as LNG. The project first gained state approval back in 2007, but many Oregonians are still unsure about their support. If final approval goes through, four natural gas meter stations will be built including one here in Douglas County at milepoint 69.7. The pipeline will connect to an already built pipeline that currently stretches from British Columbia, Canada to Malin, Oregon. This plan is according to the proposal that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission releasedRead More →

Sometimes the process of getting healthy requires a little assistance. The new local chapter of the global Blue Zones project is attempting to do just that. They promote healthy living in all aspects of life, including diet. Thirty percent of Oregon adults are now obese, according to “The State of Obesity” report by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Oregon is not alone in the battle for healthy choices; half of U.S. states now have obesity rates of more than 30%, including four states in the South with rates of more than 35%, according to the Center for Disease Control’sRead More →

Passion comes through loud and clear whenever Sophia Garcia, UCC’s Accommodations Specialist Ambassador, explains why she enjoys working with students so much. Garcia, who is currently pursuing an Associates of Arts Oregon Transfer degree at UCC, serves as the friendly face of the Accessibility office. “I just want students to be empowered through us,” Garcia says. Garcia asserts what she considers to be the best thing about working in Accessibility: “Seeing people succeed when they didn’t think that they could.” Even though accessibility offices are common across U.S. college campuses, students often fail to reachout for accommodations and support. One of the reasons for thisRead More →

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America lists symptoms, provides tips on anxiety management. The Anxiety and Depression Association of America states that “anxiety disorders are real, serious medical conditions – just as real and serious as physical disorders such as heart disease or diabetes. Anxiety disorders are the most common and pervasive mental disorders in the United States.” And, anxiety is on the rise. “There is no question that all of the national surveys we have at our fingertips show a distinct rise in the number of mental health problems,” Dr. Jerald Kay, chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the Wright State UniversityRead More →

In 2017, Healthline reported that many people are unaware that nearly 4% of American adults (as many as 9 million people) are affected by one of the three ADHD disorders. Adult ADHD, which impacts brain functioning, presents in ways that may affect decision-making, memory, academic achievement, relationship stability, general social interactions, and substance abuse. Healthline reported that “if left undiagnosed and untreated, ADHD and its frequent companions, depression and low self-esteem, can prevent the sufferer from reaching his or her full potential.” Various characteristic behaviors can reveal an adult ADHD diagnosis. Some of them are when a person is unable to stop being late orRead More →

Editor’s note: Design Editor Jayden Dukes shares her experiences with weight discrimination. Looks can be deceiving. They can also lead to damaging discrimination and stigmatization, especially for healthy women and men considered obese by outdated CDC weight standards. According to a study by Rebecca M. Puhl and Chelsea A. Heuer published in the American Journal of Public Health, “Stigmatization of obese individuals poses serious risks to their psychological and physical health, generates health disparities, and interferes with implementation of effective obesity prevention efforts.” The authors go on to warn that current views related to obesity need to be updated: “Although these assumptions about obesity andRead More →

New food supplier provides vegan options The quality, creativity, and flavor of menus prepared in food trucks is driving consumers to these innovative food services, and now that option is readily available on campus. In collaboration with the local food truck, Wrappin and Rollin, the UCC Bookstore now sells readily available 100% plant-based meals to go. Wrappin and Rollin is a plant-based mobile food truck food service owned by Darci Hawkins and her husband. Darci’s daughter Hannah Hawkins was a former RiverHawk basketball player and a former editor of The Mainstream. Wrappin and Rollin has been operating in Roseburg since 2016, where they began asRead More →