Josh Whetzel/ The MainstreamShown are two graphs comparing the wants of students versus their actual consumption. Student diet survey clears up misleading assumptions on college students’ eating habits Most people assume that college students, in their newfound freedom, eat whatever they want. Students are, however, affected by accessibility and affordability. We wondered what college students eat, so The Mainstream surveyed 16 students at random. We used Canvas to message students in Writing 121, Journalism Production, and Writing for The Media, while also surveying students roaming the campus. The majority of students (56%) said that they make their decision on what to eat based on whatRead More →

Owen Cherry/MainstreamKylee Aldstadt, a UCC welding student, works on her vertical welds while building a fish club in the UCC welding shop. College welding program builds students’ skills to succeed in a competitive industry Welding — for some, it’s just an elective they’re talked into taking in high school. For others, it inspires a lifetime career filled with creativity. But not everyone whose mind is sparked by the art of welding follows it through to a college degree. Too many are left confused about the importance of proper training and intermediate classes. Some believe that the skills they’ve learned as a high schooler are allRead More →

Photo illustration by Boone Olson Playing Dirty Revenge porn resurfaces following congresswoman’s resignation; state law updates Imagine yourself in the prime of your life. Young and uncaring, you expose yourself by sharing and engaging in sexually explicit, yet private acts, never believing that your most intimate messages and photos will be posted for the whole world to see. This is exactly what happened to now-former congresswoman Katie Hill, a target of the invasion of privacy known as “revenge porn.” Hill’s situation is unique as a congresswoman, but the fact that intimate photos were released is common. Since the rise of instant messaging, “sexting” (the actRead More →

Katelyn Buxton/ The Mainstream Andrew Laniohan as Professor Richard Pierson, and Jesika Barnes as reporter Carl Phillips in The War of the Worlds. Historic radio play “War of the Worlds” captivates audience in Wayne Crooch classroom American radio listeners were shocked on Oct. 30, 1938 to learn that aliens had supposedly landed in New Jersey. On October 31, 2019, an audience at UCC was captivated by the same historic radio production of “The War of the Worlds” that had caused a mass panic over 80 years earlier. While people may no longer bat an eye at stories of aliens invading the earth, “The War ofRead More →

Photo provided by PixabayShare the love with your body and your mind by eating a plant-based diet. Eat cheaper and faster while becoming the healthiest version of you Is it possible to seem healthy and have coronary artery disease (CAD), even while in college? Yes, unfortunately having CAD by the time a person graduates from high school is now common. In an article on plant-based diets and coronary artery disease, Caldwell B. Esselstyn, M.D., wrote about two studies on young people and CAD. A 1999 autopsy study of American youths who had died from accidents, suicides and homicides showed that CAD was prolific, and anotherRead More →

Owen Cherry/ The Mainstream Tratz asks Libby Fregoso (left) and Kylie Merlino (right) questions in Spanish during class. Spanish instructor uses unique teaching method to increase student language acquisition Learning a language can be hard, but it shouldn’t be boring. That’s why Nicholas Tratz, the Spanish instructor at Umpqua Community College, takes a novel approach to language learning. The fundamental difference between standard language teaching and Tratz’s approach lies in the distinction between learning about a language and acquiring a language. “Acquisition is when a student’s mind has actually taken in the words and phrases of language and made sense of them,” Tratz says. “ThisRead More →

Photo provided by Douglas County Sheriff’s Office Career perspectives: law enforcementStudent rides along with sheriff dad Working as a cop will be dull — but when it isn’t, mayhem ensues. Most of the time Deputy Travis Whetzel, a Douglas County sheriff, writes reports, but he also wrestles with frightening situations. He has been in law enforcement for a little over 15 years: 13 years at the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, two years for the Myrtle Creek Police Department, two years in the military police and 19 years as my dad. On Monday, Oct. 21, I rode with him for the first time in his patrolRead More →

Kamilah Mirza / The Mainstream    HIV Alliance spreads awareness, educates Douglas County The HIV Alliance, which has been serving Oregon communities since 1994, comes to UCC at least once per term. This month, they came to campus to inform about their services. What is HIV and AIDS? HIV, human immunodeficiency virus, weakens the immune system and makes it harder for the body to fight off infections and certain types of cancers. It can also trigger other autoimmune conditions. AIDS, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is the final stage of HIV infection; however, not everyone who has HIV gets AIDS. Common side effects of HIV are flu likeRead More →

Inventors of lithium ion batteries awarded Nobel Prize Ever wondered what is powering your portable electronics or what will energize the new electric vehicles? John Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham, and Akira Yoshino changed the world with their discoveries on lithium ion batteries. Just a few weeks ago Goodenough, Whittingham, and Yoshino were awarded the prestigious Nobel Prize in chemistry for their creation and development of the lithium-ion battery. The Nobel Prize is awarded annually for innovation in academic, cultural and science fields including physics, chemistry, medicine, literature, peace and economic sciences. The Nobel awards were created by Swedish chemist and engineer Alfred Nobel in 1895. Read More →

Photo provided by Pixabay Debates narrow field of Democrat candidates In the quest to defeat Donald Trump, the Democratic party has enlisted the largest and most diverse group of candidates in history. Once topping at 27 “major” candidates, the field has shrunk to a still unprecedented 18. The campaign so far has essentially been a race to see who can get attention from the party’s base of supporters before 2020. All have had the opportunity to win over the public, partly through qualifying for televised debates. Am I the only one who has noticed that the debates are too long, too overcrowded, with too muchRead More →