Photo provided by PixabayVolunteering can imporve psychological well-being and satisfaction Volunteering offers many unexpected benefits Would you volunteer if volunteering helped you to secure a scholarship? Would you volunteer if it greatly impacted your social health? Volunteering is surprisingly helpful and beneficial. Volunteering for the sake of a scholarship, however, may be hard for some who are shy or who avoid socializing. Nevertheless, the benefits may be worth the effort. “Volunteer experience may also boost your financial aid package. There are a great deal of scholarships and grants out there that list community service as a prerequisite, so if you dedicate some time each weekRead More →

Kamilah Mirza/ The Mainstream Lisa Clark is a student at UCC with chemical sensitivities and asthma. The Prevalence of chemical sensitivities and asthma among students For most students, perfume is just an accessory. For others it’s a nightmare. When a student with chemical sensitivities arrives to class and prepares to take out their textbook and pen, they can easily be hit with a strong scent of perfume. They may gather their belongings and move to the back of the class. Although they moved away from the scent, a migraine may still start and begin to sink in, however. They may also start to feel aRead More →

Josh Whetzel/ The MainstreamShown are two graphs comparing the wants of students versus their actual consumption. Student diet survey clears up misleading assumptions on college students’ eating habits Most people assume that college students, in their newfound freedom, eat whatever they want. Students are, however, affected by accessibility and affordability. We wondered what college students eat, so The Mainstream surveyed 16 students at random. We used Canvas to message students in Writing 121, Journalism Production, and Writing for The Media, while also surveying students roaming the campus. The majority of students (56%) said that they make their decision on what to eat based on whatRead More →

Owen Cherry/MainstreamKylee Aldstadt, a UCC welding student, works on her vertical welds while building a fish club in the UCC welding shop. College welding program builds students’ skills to succeed in a competitive industry Welding — for some, it’s just an elective they’re talked into taking in high school. For others, it inspires a lifetime career filled with creativity. But not everyone whose mind is sparked by the art of welding follows it through to a college degree. Too many are left confused about the importance of proper training and intermediate classes. Some believe that the skills they’ve learned as a high schooler are allRead More →

Katelyn Buxton/ The Mainstream Andrew Laniohan as Professor Richard Pierson, and Jesika Barnes as reporter Carl Phillips in The War of the Worlds. Historic radio play “War of the Worlds” captivates audience in Wayne Crooch classroom American radio listeners were shocked on Oct. 30, 1938 to learn that aliens had supposedly landed in New Jersey. On October 31, 2019, an audience at UCC was captivated by the same historic radio production of “The War of the Worlds” that had caused a mass panic over 80 years earlier. While people may no longer bat an eye at stories of aliens invading the earth, “The War ofRead More →

Photo provided by PixabayShare the love with your body and your mind by eating a plant-based diet. Eat cheaper and faster while becoming the healthiest version of you Is it possible to seem healthy and have coronary artery disease (CAD), even while in college? Yes, unfortunately having CAD by the time a person graduates from high school is now common. In an article on plant-based diets and coronary artery disease, Caldwell B. Esselstyn, M.D., wrote about two studies on young people and CAD. A 1999 autopsy study of American youths who had died from accidents, suicides and homicides showed that CAD was prolific, and anotherRead More →

Owen Cherry/ The Mainstream Tratz asks Libby Fregoso (left) and Kylie Merlino (right) questions in Spanish during class. Spanish instructor uses unique teaching method to increase student language acquisition Learning a language can be hard, but it shouldn’t be boring. That’s why Nicholas Tratz, the Spanish instructor at Umpqua Community College, takes a novel approach to language learning. The fundamental difference between standard language teaching and Tratz’s approach lies in the distinction between learning about a language and acquiring a language. “Acquisition is when a student’s mind has actually taken in the words and phrases of language and made sense of them,” Tratz says. “ThisRead More →

Photo provided by Douglas County Sheriff’s Office Career perspectives: law enforcementStudent rides along with sheriff dad Working as a cop will be dull — but when it isn’t, mayhem ensues. Most of the time Deputy Travis Whetzel, a Douglas County sheriff, writes reports, but he also wrestles with frightening situations. He has been in law enforcement for a little over 15 years: 13 years at the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, two years for the Myrtle Creek Police Department, two years in the military police and 19 years as my dad. On Monday, Oct. 21, I rode with him for the first time in his patrolRead More →

Owen Cherry/ The Mainstream New daycare on campus hoping to help students and staff Finding affordable child care in Douglas County, described by some as a “daycare desert,” is often a struggle. For parents, finding a safe place to leave their kids can obviously be one of life’s biggest stressors Following the shutdown this year of the campus’s former Ford Family Enrichment Center, students and staff worried about what alternatives would open up. Now, looking to fill the FFEC’s shoes, the recently moved Maple Corner Montessori (MCM) daycare, preschool, kindergarten and elementary school is operating on campus. UCC President Debra Thatcher, who was referenced inRead More →

Kamilah Mirza/ The Mainstream Council works for more inclusivity on campus The Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Council, or D.E.I., is currently in the beginning stages of work to create and promote a more inclusive and diverse atmosphere on campus. The D.E.I. wants to start a campus-wide dialogue regarding students’ needs related to diversity, equity and inclusion. They are also working on implementing a cultural competency plan for campus in accordance with the Oregon HB 2864 bill and the HECC Equity Lens. 2014-2015 Report In 2015 the Higher Education Coordination Commission (HECC) created a work group to analyze and develop recommendations based on data regarding underrepresentedRead More →

Owen Cherry / The Mainstream Chemistry professor discusses common obstacles and success strategies for chemistry students Joseph Villa, who has a doctorate in analytic/environmental chemistry, has been a chemistry professor at Umpqua Community College since 2014. Villa spent 13 years studying chemistry. Here he shares some of his educational story with insights on how to succeed as a chemistry student. What drew you to study chemistry? Up until the 10th grade I was convinced I was going to be a child psychiatrist. That was what I thought I wanted to do. But in 10th grade I took a biology course with a really great teacher,Read More →

Katelyn Buxton/ The Mainstream Study groups enable students to succeed The average college GPA for a math major is 2.90 with only 2.78 for chemistry majors, according to a study done by Kevin Rask of Wake Forest University. For anyone struggling with these subjects, this is not surprising. However, majors and non-majors alike can get help through UCC’s study groups. Study groups are dedicated meetings with an academic coach. While students may meet with the coaches other times, study groups enable students to come together and discuss the subject as a body. Students are often pleased with the results of attending academic coaching. “Study groupsRead More →

Photos: Katelyn / Mainstream Starting in January, students at Oregon’s colleges and universities may begin to get some relief from textbook prices thanks to the passage of House Bill 2213. This is only the most recent in a line of laws enacted to change the way students use textbooks. This bill necessitates that colleges set measurable goals for increasing textbook affordability. Previous bills created a state-level Open Educational Resource librarian position to support the use of OER in Oregon, which was soon followed by House Bill 2871. This bill required community colleges to designate no-cost and low-cost textbook courses. Open educational resources are free teachingRead More →