Donald Trump speaking at the Iowa Republican Party's 2015 Lincoln Dinner. Photo credited by Gage Skidmore

Photo credited by Gage Skidmore After nine weeks, the initial phase of Donald Trump’s impeachment has ended. In what consisted of five days of public testimonials, from current and former officials in and around the White House, plenty of previously unknown information was brought to light. Now, House Democrats say they are convinced they can build a public case, arguing the president has abused his power. Day 1: Rep. Adam Schiff (Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, D-CA): Opening the hearing, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) made clear what he saw as the purpose of the impeachment investigation: “If we find that the President of theRead More →

Photo illustration by Boone Olson Playing Dirty Revenge porn resurfaces following congresswoman’s resignation; state law updates Imagine yourself in the prime of your life. Young and uncaring, you expose yourself by sharing and engaging in sexually explicit, yet private acts, never believing that your most intimate messages and photos will be posted for the whole world to see. This is exactly what happened to now-former congresswoman Katie Hill, a target of the invasion of privacy known as “revenge porn.” Hill’s situation is unique as a congresswoman, but the fact that intimate photos were released is common. Since the rise of instant messaging, “sexting” (the actRead More →

Inventors of lithium ion batteries awarded Nobel Prize Ever wondered what is powering your portable electronics or what will energize the new electric vehicles? John Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham, and Akira Yoshino changed the world with their discoveries on lithium ion batteries. Just a few weeks ago Goodenough, Whittingham, and Yoshino were awarded the prestigious Nobel Prize in chemistry for their creation and development of the lithium-ion battery. The Nobel Prize is awarded annually for innovation in academic, cultural and science fields including physics, chemistry, medicine, literature, peace and economic sciences. The Nobel awards were created by Swedish chemist and engineer Alfred Nobel in 1895. Read More →

Photo provided by Pixabay Debates narrow field of Democrat candidates In the quest to defeat Donald Trump, the Democratic party has enlisted the largest and most diverse group of candidates in history. Once topping at 27 “major” candidates, the field has shrunk to a still unprecedented 18. The campaign so far has essentially been a race to see who can get attention from the party’s base of supporters before 2020. All have had the opportunity to win over the public, partly through qualifying for televised debates. Am I the only one who has noticed that the debates are too long, too overcrowded, with too muchRead More →

Sparked by allegations of improper conduct with a foreign leader, Donald Trump is now facing the one direct threat to his power that a coequal branch of government can force: impeachment. Representative Adam Schiff’s impeachment inquiry is making the case that attempting to gather political opposition from another country (and potentially withholding their funds that had been approved by Congress) is a violation of the Presidential Oath of Office. For the average person who has better things to do than spend 24 hours a day paying attention to the news, talk of impeachment and Trump is often met with confusion and misunderstanding. With internet trollsRead More →

Photos: Owen / Mainstream Bananas may soon be only a memory for consumers around the globe. The arrival of a deadly fungal banana disease in the Americas led Colombia to declare a state of emergency in August, according the Colombian Ministry of Agriculture. Bananas are the most popular fruit in the United States with annual banana consumption more than doubling that of apples and oranges combined, according to U. N. statistics. But the United States favorite fruit snack may disappear entirely because no treatment for the disease has been found; fungicides are ineffective. The fungal disease has caused widespread destruction on banana plantations in Asia,Read More →

Top Grossing Movie Top YouTube Video To our daughter Best Selling Book Becoming by Michelle Obama Top Song Search Top Tweet Hashtag #InMyFeelingsChallenge Top Search on Google World Cup Top Song Most Liked Instagram Photo World record egg Top News Article World Cup Most Played Video Game Top “How to” Search How to vote Most Downloaded App TicTok Most Watched TV Show Most Visited Place Bangkok Most Photographed Place Central Park, New York Most Watched EventRead More →

Registered voters in the Winston Dillard school district voted yes on a General Obligation Bond Levy on May 21, 2019, to provide $16 million dollars toward replacing two buildings and renovating two others at Douglas High School. The state of Oregon will contribute an additional $4 million grant to the WD school district, bringing total funds to renovate the high school to $20 million dollars. The school has educated more than three generations of Douglas County residents, and has suffered damages. Leaking classroom roofs, snow-collapsed cafeterias, inadequate heating and electrical, and outdated gymnasium and locker rooms. Estimated tax rate after the bond passage is $1.39/$1,000Read More →

The UCC 2019-2020 budget was proposed and approved during the month of May. A major concern, in terms of budget shortages, with this new budget was the “increase in revenue sources as the state allocation doesn’t keep up with the cost increases” Natalya Brown, chief financial officer, and Katie Workman, budget manager, said. “It remains a concern for all of the community colleges in Oregon.” The state currently allocates $590 million for the community college support fund. “In the case that allocation doesn’t hold, UCC will need to look into additional budget adjustments,” Brown and Workman said. Another source of revenue could have come fromRead More →

The UCC bookstore roof, damaged from heavy snows in March, is being repaired by Roseburg Roofing. To help fund the bookstore roof repair, $150,000 was transferred from UCC’s general fund, according to the May UCC board report. The old roof was removed and new roofing material installed during a period of sunny skies in late April and early May. The bookstore was open during the process with taping around the sidewalk to protect students and staff.Read More →

UCC student Cody Phillips’s car was stolen from the UCC campus Friday, April 26. Phillips left his blue Honda in the UCC parking lot, west of the Whipple center, just before 11 a.m. After he and fellow student Zach Schissler put their backpacks with laptops inside. He returned shortly at around noon to discover his 1994 Civic Hatchback and his valuables inside were nowhere to be found. After searching the surrounding parking lot, Phillips contacted the police and UCC security to report the missing car. UCC security was unable to find any evidence from campus security surveillance tapes of how the car was stolen. TheRead More →

As the list of front runners in the coming 2020 U.S. presidential election continues to assemble, the number of female candidates has surpassed the previous election by double. In the 2016 elections, only 12% of running candidates were female. In the current election race, 33% of 18 candidates are female, according to The Washington Post. The U.S. isn’t the only country experiencing a rise of female politicians. In the current 116th Congress, 131 women currently serve in both the House and the Senate, compared to last year’s total of 115, according to Congressional Research Service reports. These numbers contradict polls which have shown some AmericansRead More →

The fate of the Ford Family Enrichment Center is up for question Children and copious tears are not normally on the agenda for a UCC board meeting, but there were a lot of both at the last meeting when the closure of the Ford Family Enrichment Center was discussed. With only three minutes each to voice their individual opinions, UCC students, parents, and community members, voices shaking with tears, spoke against the closing of the daycare. One pregnant woman speaking against the closure started with a calm voice, but soon lost her composure, tears rolling down her face as she hugged her baby bump. InRead More →