Holiday meal table setting. Photo from: Pixabay Holiday Meal Recipes for Alternative Diets Holiday Meal Recipes for Alternative Diets As the holiday season approaches, many people may be planning something a little different than traditional American food staples such as meat and potatoes. When walking through grocery store isles the words “gluten-free,” “vegan,” “keto friendly,” “plaeo”, jump up at us. Diet trends are sweeping the nation and  many individuals are looking for a change. We also may have guests visiting with food intolerances or allergies and may want to ensure everyone is feeling satisfied at the dinner table. There is a plethora of unique andRead More →

Kamilah Mirza/ The Mainstream Lisa Clark is a student at UCC with chemical sensitivities and asthma. The Prevalence of chemical sensitivities and asthma among students For most students, perfume is just an accessory. For others it’s a nightmare. When a student with chemical sensitivities arrives to class and prepares to take out their textbook and pen, they can easily be hit with a strong scent of perfume. They may gather their belongings and move to the back of the class. Although they moved away from the scent, a migraine may still start and begin to sink in, however. They may also start to feel aRead More →

Josh Whetzel/ The MainstreamShown are two graphs comparing the wants of students versus their actual consumption. Student diet survey clears up misleading assumptions on college students’ eating habits Most people assume that college students, in their newfound freedom, eat whatever they want. Students are, however, affected by accessibility and affordability. We wondered what college students eat, so The Mainstream surveyed 16 students at random. We used Canvas to message students in Writing 121, Journalism Production, and Writing for The Media, while also surveying students roaming the campus. The majority of students (56%) said that they make their decision on what to eat based on whatRead More →

Photo provided by PixabayShare the love with your body and your mind by eating a plant-based diet. Eat cheaper and faster while becoming the healthiest version of you Is it possible to seem healthy and have coronary artery disease (CAD), even while in college? Yes, unfortunately having CAD by the time a person graduates from high school is now common. In an article on plant-based diets and coronary artery disease, Caldwell B. Esselstyn, M.D., wrote about two studies on young people and CAD. A 1999 autopsy study of American youths who had died from accidents, suicides and homicides showed that CAD was prolific, and anotherRead More →

Kamilah Mirza / The Mainstream    HIV Alliance spreads awareness, educates Douglas County The HIV Alliance, which has been serving Oregon communities since 1994, comes to UCC at least once per term. This month, they came to campus to inform about their services. What is HIV and AIDS? HIV, human immunodeficiency virus, weakens the immune system and makes it harder for the body to fight off infections and certain types of cancers. It can also trigger other autoimmune conditions. AIDS, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is the final stage of HIV infection; however, not everyone who has HIV gets AIDS. Common side effects of HIV are flu likeRead More →

Photo provided by Christine Ross Local doctor promotes plant based diets The average person over the age of 65 takes eight pills a day, according to Dr. Charles Ross, the developer of a plant-based diet training being taught locally through Umpqua Community Veg Education Group, known as UCVEG. “And that means some senior is taking 16 pills because I am taking none,” Ross says. Ross developed the whole food plant-based diet after taking several different statins to lower his cholesterol but finding he wasn’t able to tolerate them. Then one night eight years ago, he and his wife Christine were watching a CNN documentary, TheRead More →

Silas Scott/ The Mainstream Blood drive successful John Jachetta attends the American Red Cross blood drives in Roseburg, Oregon every couple of months whether it is UCC’s drive or the drive at the local Red Cross center. “It is good for me to give my blood every couple of months because it renews my blood,” said Jachetta. Bobbi Long, a phlebotomist who works for the Red Cross and has for years, offers confirmation of Jachetta’s perspective. She knows the benefits of blood donations, “For men, it reduces a chance of a heart attack by 80%,” she says. This benefit is larger in men because menRead More →

For centuries, human beings have smoked. Be it nicotine, marijuana, opium, or cocaine, our species has been purposefully inhaling toxins to get high. Despite the risks that come, smokers have always been looking for ways to evolve their habits, including the new practice of vaping. Originally seen as a somewhat healthier alternative to smoking regular cigarettes, vaping and electronic cigarettes have boomed in the market since 2003. Now, nearly 17 years later, people are dying as a result of these vapors and their related illnesses.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at least 26 people have died with another 1,100 reported sick.Read More →

Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus has killed 11 people in the United States in 2019 alone. This year has seen an unusual increase in the number of reported cases and deaths. Every year in the United States, there are typically only five to 10 human cases reported, with only 30% of all cases resulting in death. Many survivors experience ongoing neurological problems, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Eastern Equine Encephalitis, more commonly known as EEE, is a rare cause of brain infections. This should not be confused with the Zika virus, which usually has no symptoms or mild symptoms, and isRead More →

Editor’s note: While reporters do not normally share personal experiences, Kamilah’s own experience with domestic violence helps add depth and insight to her story. A quarter of people living in the U.S. are directly affected by domestic violence, so the probabilities of knowing a person affected by domestic violence are high. “More than 1 in 3 Women (35.6%) and more than 1 in 4 men (28.5%) in the U.S. (have) experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an in intimate partner in their lifetime,”  according to a survey provided by the CDC. This is not only a national issue; domestic violence affects us here atRead More →

Photos: Owen / Mainstream Bananas may soon be only a memory for consumers around the globe. The arrival of a deadly fungal banana disease in the Americas led Colombia to declare a state of emergency in August, according the Colombian Ministry of Agriculture. Bananas are the most popular fruit in the United States with annual banana consumption more than doubling that of apples and oranges combined, according to U. N. statistics. But the United States favorite fruit snack may disappear entirely because no treatment for the disease has been found; fungicides are ineffective. The fungal disease has caused widespread destruction on banana plantations in Asia,Read More →

Sometimes the process of getting healthy requires a little assistance. The new local chapter of the global Blue Zones project is attempting to do just that. They promote healthy living in all aspects of life, including diet. Thirty percent of Oregon adults are now obese, according to “The State of Obesity” report by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Oregon is not alone in the battle for healthy choices; half of U.S. states now have obesity rates of more than 30%, including four states in the South with rates of more than 35%, according to the Center for Disease Control’sRead More →

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America lists symptoms, provides tips on anxiety management. The Anxiety and Depression Association of America states that “anxiety disorders are real, serious medical conditions – just as real and serious as physical disorders such as heart disease or diabetes. Anxiety disorders are the most common and pervasive mental disorders in the United States.” And, anxiety is on the rise. “There is no question that all of the national surveys we have at our fingertips show a distinct rise in the number of mental health problems,” Dr. Jerald Kay, chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the Wright State UniversityRead More →