Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus has killed 11 people in the United States in 2019 alone. This year has seen an unusual increase in the number of reported cases and deaths. Every year in the United States, there are typically only five to 10 human cases reported, with only 30% of all cases resulting in death. Many survivors experience ongoing neurological problems, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Eastern Equine Encephalitis, more commonly known as EEE, is a rare cause of brain infections. This should not be confused with the Zika virus, which usually has no symptoms or mild symptoms, and isRead More →

Photos: Owen / Mainstream Bananas may soon be only a memory for consumers around the globe. The arrival of a deadly fungal banana disease in the Americas led Colombia to declare a state of emergency in August, according the Colombian Ministry of Agriculture. Bananas are the most popular fruit in the United States with annual banana consumption more than doubling that of apples and oranges combined, according to U. N. statistics. But the United States favorite fruit snack may disappear entirely because no treatment for the disease has been found; fungicides are ineffective. The fungal disease has caused widespread destruction on banana plantations in Asia,Read More →

The February snowstorm led to the loss of many campus trees. To counteract the losses, ASUCC put together a tree planting ceremony. The snowpocalypse,  also known as Snowstorm Ryan, left the once beautiful campus looking in ruins with down trees and fallen debris. Pamela Goodwin, the ASUCC Event Coordinator, noticed both staff and student concern about the campus’s appearance. “I am a firm believer that, if you don’t like something, find a way to change it.” To make that change, clubs came together on Friday, May 10 to replant trees on UCC’s campus. A total of 16 trees were planted. Staff and students planted sixRead More →

The Jordan Cove Energy Project is a proposal by Canadian-based energy company Pembina to install a 234-mile long pipeline across Oregon that will transport liquified natural gas, more commonly known as LNG. The project first gained state approval back in 2007, but many Oregonians are still unsure about their support. If final approval goes through, four natural gas meter stations will be built including one here in Douglas County at milepoint 69.7. The pipeline will connect to an already built pipeline that currently stretches from British Columbia, Canada to Malin, Oregon. This plan is according to the proposal that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission releasedRead More →

The Oregon Department of State Lands recently hosted public hearings across Oregon to help Vicki Walker, director of DSL, decide whether or not to grant Jordan Cove LNG, the Canadian natural gas company, one of the many permits required for an underground natural gas pipeline. In Canyonville’s meeting at Seven Feathers Casino, on Jan. 9, over 300 concerned people packed the room. DSL listened to passionate community input regarding Jordan Cove’s application for the Removal-Fill permit needed for the company’s proposed pipeline. Subsequently, the permit was denied on Jan. 23. According to an article from the News Review, Circuit court judge Kathleen Johnson reversed theRead More →

Community members assembled at Stewart Park for the Martin Luther King’s Day river clean-up on Monday January 21. This volunteer-based event started at 10 a.m. Monday morning underneath the Stewart Park pavilion for a 3-hour long community service act in honor of the King.  Maris Wilson with Umpqua Watersheds and Americorp helped coordinate and lead Monday’s event. As Education Outreach Coordinator, she assisted in rallying people together to help clean up the surrounding area between Stewart Park and Gaddis Park with donated supplies from Umpqua Watersheds and DC Co-op. Wilson said, “I feel really gracious that today’s community came on their day off to pickRead More →

Despite the colder weather, traveling has managed to remain a favorite tradition during the Autumn and Winter months. With chilling weather conditions there comes a certain level of danger. When traveling during this season, expect the unexpected. According to data conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety and the Auto Insurance Center, wintry weather conditions have killed over 4,000 Americans in car accidents. Mudslides, flooding, falling trees and power lines, black ice, and blizzard conditions can be some of the types of severe weather encountered as the weather becomes freezing. Don’t be one of those caught off guard. Here are some tips on how toRead More →

Faster than some might have expected, the time has come to prepare homes for winter storms and freezing nights. For those who are new to living on their own, cheap and doable tasks are key to saving money and home safety during this season. Students are already drowning in responsibilities, so a little preventive care can make life easier in the long run. Here are some useful tips on how to maintain a safe and warm house: 1. Clean The Gutters Cleaning your gutters before winter hits may not be as fun as decorating your home for the upcoming holiday season, but it can definitelyRead More →

As a college student, finding easy and budget friendly ways to “go green” can seem nearly impossible. DIY projects can be too time consuming, and few college students have money to invest in eco-friendly appliances and solar panels. Many want to make a difference, but don’t know how. We want change, but what can we do? “It’s bad. The U.S. should really make some changes in how we use fossil fuels,” Laura Ekada, a UCC wrestling athlete, said. Worrying about larger issues like climate change can undermine efforts on smaller steps that even busy college students can take to go green. And, reduction of localRead More →

National Parks Week in April isn’t the only time to go out and explore new places or even visit that old favorite spot in nature. Throughout the year, Oregon`s national parks offer fun activities and opportunities that are often over looked. “I got to go to Crater Lake for National Park week; it was free entry and was a beautiful hike. I think everyone should get out and enjoy our National Parks whenever they get the chance,” Madalyn Pickett, a UCC dual enrollment student, said. Crater Lake is one favorite spot all year with more to do than meets the eye. Facts about Crater Lake:Read More →

Glade, Air Wick, Spot Shot, Spic and Span Multi-Surface and Floor Cleaner, Ajax, Dynamo and Fab Ultra Liquid Laundry Detergents are common household products that have been listed on the “Cleaners Hall of Shame” by The Environmental Working Group. In a study conducted in 2012, these products were found to be the most harmful household products. These are not the only problematic cleaning products. Many cleaning supplies can cause some terrible symptoms over time such as coughing, sneezing, skin rashes and even headaches. Many cleaning supplies have a warning on the bottle of what can happen if the use of these products are prolonged. ARead More →

As the days get warmer and summer gets closer, everyone has an itch to get outside and enjoy the beautiful weather, but staying safe in the rushing rivers and hot sun should still be a priority, according to health authorities. The rivers in the area are not warm enough to swim in yet. “Air temperatures may feel hot, and the water may feel or appear warm, but temperatures can be extremely cold below the surface. Hypothermia can quickly set in and overwhelm even the strongest of swimmers, becoming too weak to escape,” Recreation.gov states. Rivers can be some of the most dangerous places to visitRead More →

Douglas County’s bucks have shed their antlers this year, and most, if not all of the elk bulls have done the same. The process of finding shed antlers usually takes a lot of time and hiking distance, but the prospect of fresh sheds keeps some antler enthusiasts obsessed with sheds for months on end. Learning how to find cervid headgear can be difficult, but by applying a few of the right techniques, shed hunting can be more productive. Shed hunters often lead their inexperienced partners right over a shed while peering through binoculars or scouting rub spots. Carefully observing the ground is more important thanRead More →