From left to right: Joanie Chambers, Debbie Field, Jim Paris, Steve Erickson, Yuki Taylor, and Boone Olson all pose for a photo behind the planted ginkgo tree. (Photo provided by Akiyo Riggs) Hiroshima peace tree planted at UCC Editor’s note: Mainstream Design Editor Boone Olson participated in the planting of the ginkgo seedling on February 28.  A flash of light, a deafening boom, and a colossal mushroom cloud. These are the hallmarks of an atomic bomb, heralding the arrival of a device with massive destructive power. For Japan, the coming of the 75th anniversary of the “Little Boy” nuclear bomb being dropped on Hiroshima isRead More →

Photo provided by Aaron CherryWild fires have an important function in maintaining the healthy and diversity of a forest ecosystem. Fire plays important role in forest ecology Wildfires play a complex role in forest ecosystems. While often perceived by the public as universally destructive, the real picture of the effects of wildfire on forests is more diverse. Fire often performs critical ecosystem functions within the forest ecosystem, but when forests are managed without taking into account the importance of fire within a forest the result if often severe, destructive, and uncontrollable wildfires. Forest management practices play a key role in preventing the deleterious effects soRead More →

Lisa Clark/ The MainstreamNursing Student Cami Mattravers feels great eating a Whole Food Plant Based diet. The food you eat can determine how you live Despite the incredible advances in medicine and science, lifestyle changes are essential to living a long, healthy life. “Back in 1903, Thomas Edison predicted that the ‘doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will instruct his patient in the care of [the] human frame in diet and in the cause and prevention of diseases,’” says Dr. Michael Greger in his book “How Not to Die.” More than 100 years later the majority of doctors are still not instructingRead More →

Kacy Buxton/The MainstreamImg tagThe Athletic Complex and Tom Keel Fitness Center after the February 2019 snowstorm “Snowpocalypse.” Better safe than sorry: Preparing for winter weather “Careful planning is a must,” said Tim Fjeld Seven Feather’s Safety Manager, while discussing tips for keeping safe and prepared for winter weather.  Planning is important, but if the required action is not taken then the plan was all for nothing. To be safe and prepared for any winter emergency, you need to take an active part in checking weather and road conditions.  “I encourage our folks to look out the window and assess their location, assess their destination andRead More →

Christian DeWeese/The MainstreamThe observatory is located above the campus by the Tower Building. Observatory allows students to view astronomical objects in real time Most people think of their home as a house with a roof and some windows. But our home is really located in the Milky Way. The Paul Morgan Observatory, behind the UCC Technology Center, houses the state’s largest solar telescope in an unassuming 10 foot square building and is used to observe our cosmic neighborhood. The observatory, named by students to honor UCC’s astronomy professor, opened in 2016 after the school received $100,000 in donations. The observatory presents real time images ofRead More →

Kamilah Mirza/ The Mainstream Lisa Clark is a student at UCC with chemical sensitivities and asthma. The Prevalence of chemical sensitivities and asthma among students For most students, perfume is just an accessory. For others it’s a nightmare. When a student with chemical sensitivities arrives to class and prepares to take out their textbook and pen, they can easily be hit with a strong scent of perfume. They may gather their belongings and move to the back of the class. Although they moved away from the scent, a migraine may still start and begin to sink in, however. They may also start to feel aRead More →

Kamilah Mirza / The Mainstream    HIV Alliance spreads awareness, educates Douglas County The HIV Alliance, which has been serving Oregon communities since 1994, comes to UCC at least once per term. This month, they came to campus to inform about their services. What is HIV and AIDS? HIV, human immunodeficiency virus, weakens the immune system and makes it harder for the body to fight off infections and certain types of cancers. It can also trigger other autoimmune conditions. AIDS, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is the final stage of HIV infection; however, not everyone who has HIV gets AIDS. Common side effects of HIV are flu likeRead More →

Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus has killed 11 people in the United States in 2019 alone. This year has seen an unusual increase in the number of reported cases and deaths. Every year in the United States, there are typically only five to 10 human cases reported, with only 30% of all cases resulting in death. Many survivors experience ongoing neurological problems, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Eastern Equine Encephalitis, more commonly known as EEE, is a rare cause of brain infections. This should not be confused with the Zika virus, which usually has no symptoms or mild symptoms, and isRead More →

Photos: Owen / Mainstream Bananas may soon be only a memory for consumers around the globe. The arrival of a deadly fungal banana disease in the Americas led Colombia to declare a state of emergency in August, according the Colombian Ministry of Agriculture. Bananas are the most popular fruit in the United States with annual banana consumption more than doubling that of apples and oranges combined, according to U. N. statistics. But the United States favorite fruit snack may disappear entirely because no treatment for the disease has been found; fungicides are ineffective. The fungal disease has caused widespread destruction on banana plantations in Asia,Read More →

The February snowstorm led to the loss of many campus trees. To counteract the losses, ASUCC put together a tree planting ceremony. The snowpocalypse,  also known as Snowstorm Ryan, left the once beautiful campus looking in ruins with down trees and fallen debris. Pamela Goodwin, the ASUCC Event Coordinator, noticed both staff and student concern about the campus’s appearance. “I am a firm believer that, if you don’t like something, find a way to change it.” To make that change, clubs came together on Friday, May 10 to replant trees on UCC’s campus. A total of 16 trees were planted. Staff and students planted sixRead More →

The Jordan Cove Energy Project is a proposal by Canadian-based energy company Pembina to install a 234-mile long pipeline across Oregon that will transport liquified natural gas, more commonly known as LNG. The project first gained state approval back in 2007, but many Oregonians are still unsure about their support. If final approval goes through, four natural gas meter stations will be built including one here in Douglas County at milepoint 69.7. The pipeline will connect to an already built pipeline that currently stretches from British Columbia, Canada to Malin, Oregon. This plan is according to the proposal that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission releasedRead More →

The Oregon Department of State Lands recently hosted public hearings across Oregon to help Vicki Walker, director of DSL, decide whether or not to grant Jordan Cove LNG, the Canadian natural gas company, one of the many permits required for an underground natural gas pipeline. In Canyonville’s meeting at Seven Feathers Casino, on Jan. 9, over 300 concerned people packed the room. DSL listened to passionate community input regarding Jordan Cove’s application for the Removal-Fill permit needed for the company’s proposed pipeline. Subsequently, the permit was denied on Jan. 23. According to an article from the News Review, Circuit court judge Kathleen Johnson reversed theRead More →

Community members assembled at Stewart Park for the Martin Luther King’s Day river clean-up on Monday January 21. This volunteer-based event started at 10 a.m. Monday morning underneath the Stewart Park pavilion for a 3-hour long community service act in honor of the King.  Maris Wilson with Umpqua Watersheds and Americorp helped coordinate and lead Monday’s event. As Education Outreach Coordinator, she assisted in rallying people together to help clean up the surrounding area between Stewart Park and Gaddis Park with donated supplies from Umpqua Watersheds and DC Co-op. Wilson said, “I feel really gracious that today’s community came on their day off to pickRead More →