For someone who is stalked, the fear doesn’t end at the front door. It often continues in nightmares; for example, a married woman having a peaceful night’s rest is woken up, not by her husband, but by the dark eyes of a stalker, and the once empty home is now invaded with no signs of help.  Another  woman goes to a convention, hoping for a good time. The last thing she expects is a stalker, but that is exactly what she gets. A man follows her all night, watching her like a statue. He even asks to drive her home. She declines. Once she isRead More →

Best, biggest, burrito … all good descriptive words beginning with B, but college students especially must consider the biggest b word of them all: budget. An emerging trend among college students is finding food that’s fast, healthful, not highly-processed, and more environmentally friendly. Students are straying away from alcohol and fast food franchises towards local, healthier options (Meadows, 2003). Burritos can be an effective way to feed the savage college student, and below is a list of the best (and local) spots in town for the next time students are looking for a burrito pick-me-up. Tino’s Tacos – Roseburg (Great family meals for the price)Read More →

The Oregon Department of State Lands recently hosted public hearings across Oregon to help Vicki Walker, director of DSL, decide whether or not to grant Jordan Cove LNG, the Canadian natural gas company, one of the many permits required for an underground natural gas pipeline. In Canyonville’s meeting at Seven Feathers Casino, on Jan. 9, over 300 concerned people packed the room. DSL listened to passionate community input regarding Jordan Cove’s application for the Removal-Fill permit needed for the company’s proposed pipeline. Subsequently, the permit was denied on Jan. 23. According to an article from the News Review, Circuit court judge Kathleen Johnson reversed theRead More →

A political cause needs a compelling appeal to get people to stand strong in 46 degrees under hovering dark grey skies.  But Sunday afternoon, January 20, nearly 40 Oregonian men and women did just that at a peaceful protest entitled Womxn’s Rally 2019: Standing Strong in the Umpqua Valley. This year’s women’s rights rally is a continuation of the 2017 Women’s March which inspired record voting as well as a record number of women candidates and female election winners. The 2019 Women’s March served as a uniting voice demanding that congress listen to issues of  inequality including equal pay for women, the LGBTI community’s rightsRead More →

Community members assembled at Stewart Park for the Martin Luther King’s Day river clean-up on Monday January 21. This volunteer-based event started at 10 a.m. Monday morning underneath the Stewart Park pavilion for a 3-hour long community service act in honor of the King.  Maris Wilson with Umpqua Watersheds and Americorp helped coordinate and lead Monday’s event. As Education Outreach Coordinator, she assisted in rallying people together to help clean up the surrounding area between Stewart Park and Gaddis Park with donated supplies from Umpqua Watersheds and DC Co-op. Wilson said, “I feel really gracious that today’s community came on their day off to pickRead More →

UCC student Emily Warren, who is affiliated with the Miss Douglas County pageant, would like to share this information with the community. The Mainstream is not associated with the pageant and did not create this message. Do you want college scholarships, leadership experience, and the platform to advocate for something you are passionate about? Then come to an informational meeting for the Miss Douglas County scholarship program on December 16th at 2:00pm at the Oak Hills Golf Club in Sutherlin. The Miss Douglas County scholarship program is a local competition through the Miss America organization. Did you know that Miss America is the largest providerRead More →

After 15 years of teaching a wide variety of speech, communication, and gender classes here, associate professor Paula Usrey plans to retire at the end of fall term. “I will miss the students that I see grow and share so much (I learn so much from students), and I get so excited and there’s nothing more rewarding than to see students start from one place and taking those steps to work hard and end in a different place. I will also miss the interactions with my colleagues and friends. You think you’re going to see some people, but you usually don’t,” Usrey said. Usrey expressedRead More →

What can students do to help them get through the holiday season? From worrying about how to afford gifts for your family and friend, to struggling to prepare a Thanksgiving or Christmas feast, the holidays can be very stressful to many students who are also dealing with school. Planning your shopping ahead and finding the best deals can go a long way to keeping your wallet fatter. Rebecca Mutschler, a general studies student working to obtain her Associates of Arts Oregon Transfer degree, suggests prioritizing your time and commitments. While she thinks plenty of time should be spent relaxing with your family, you should takeRead More →

‘Tis is the season when community members work to give to family, friends, and neighbors. Volunteer at a Nursing Home Sitting around elders might not sound as fun as going to the movies or hanging with friends, but most of the time the elders in nursing homes can be lonely or maybe their family doesn’t come by often. Most times they would enjoy the company. Donate Donate money to local charities like Kidds Kids, a charity that helps children with disadvantages have a day of fun. Help end homelessness at The National Alliance to End Homelessness. To help Veterans, a great charity is the WoundedRead More →

The downtown Roseburg library will have a soft opening within the next few weeks, according to new Library Director Kris Wiley. The grand opening is planned for Jan. 10. The scheduled reopening will bring an end to a year and a half closure for the library, which was previously the heart of an 11-branch library system run by the Douglas County government. Those libraries closed due to funding difficulties after voters rejected a proposed countywide library district tax in November of 2016. Delays to a previously planned fall opening were related to construction remodeling. Soon the library will be open 30 hours a week fromRead More →

As a college student, finding easy and budget friendly ways to “go green” can seem nearly impossible. DIY projects can be too time consuming, and few college students have money to invest in eco-friendly appliances and solar panels. Many want to make a difference, but don’t know how. We want change, but what can we do? “It’s bad. The U.S. should really make some changes in how we use fossil fuels,” Laura Ekada, a UCC wrestling athlete, said. Worrying about larger issues like climate change can undermine efforts on smaller steps that even busy college students can take to go green. And, reduction of localRead More →

People nationwide are preparing for October’s month of domestic violence awareness. Students and staff gathered Friday, Oct. 5 to discuss potential ways to prevent domestic violence. Students also created an art project with red flag banners that were displayed in the Campus Center. The red flag banners on the front had red flag warnings in dating behavior like; disrespecting, controlling and guilt tripping. On the back, they showed a healthy relationship by using words like; loyalty, respect and freedom. At a second meeting on Oct. 9, students and staff wrote positive journal entries about personal boundaries and expectations from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. OnRead More →