With November’s presidential election just over four months away, voters are wondering how the vast economic downfall and the ongoing rise of tragic pandemic casualties will affect the battle between Donald Trump and Joe Biden. As the first real crisis of his presidency so far, will it be enough for Trump to lose the very supporters who sent him to Washington? The recent wave of protests following the killing of George Floyd and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic have caused massive uncertainty as to how the election might be held. Will it be safe enough for people to go out and vote by then? Primaries throughoutRead More →

Guest Opinion Women and BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) Media are notorious about sending out messages to the masses intended to avoid representing women and people of color and lack of representation is having negative impacts.  Marginalized groups, namely women and communities of color, are greatly impacted in ways such as having less access to resources, less networking opportunities, more experiences of tense and fragile societal relationships, and discrimination increases. It’s 2020, and American history books are still filled with male photographs.  Studies show that less than 11% of history textbook references are devoted to specific women. We should all be concerned about our adolescent children whose identities areRead More →

To ease the stress of being cooped up all day, as well as the looming threat of incoming midterms, UCC students have been asked an array of lighthearted quarantine hypotheticals. Here’s what they shared.  If you could pick one restaurant to be able to eat at during quarantine, where would it be and why?  Definitely a Mexican restaurant. I love the energy and getting chips before the meal! –Julia Spens  I would eat at Panera Bread in Eugene. It’s not in Roseburg, so I can’t eat there right now, and I love soup and good bread so that’s my favorite place to go! –Sicily Tornell  I would wantRead More →

Photos provided by the candidates Facebook pages The race for the Democratic nomination has reached its most volatile stage as voting has begun. Following results from 17 states, former Vice President Joe Biden has pulled off a massive comeback and has quickly re-emerged as the race’s leader. As he prepares to square off against Senator Sanders, the two are competing to build up a base of support that will help them in the fight against President Trump. While it’s still unclear who will ultimately head to the general election, Douglas County donors are making it known who they believe is the most electable candidate. OpenSecrets,Read More →

Silas Scott/The Mainstream UCC instructor Alyssa Harter preparing to start her speech 218 class. Editor’s note: Mainstream Reporter Silas Scott is a student in Alyssa Harter’s Speech 111 class at Umpqua Community College. New communications instructor Alyssa Harter understands students who put off taking their required speech classes due to fear of public speaking. As a person who overcame her own public speech anxiety, or glossophobia as it is professionally termed, she can relate. However, Harter believes that studying speech early in your education will benefit you later on. “Students communicate with speech every day. They also will be benefited by it as they willRead More →

Donald Trump speaking at the Iowa Republican Party's 2015 Lincoln Dinner. Photo credited by Gage Skidmore

Photo credited by Gage Skidmore After nine weeks, the initial phase of Donald Trump’s impeachment has ended. In what consisted of five days of public testimonials, from current and former officials in and around the White House, plenty of previously unknown information was brought to light. Now, House Democrats say they are convinced they can build a public case, arguing the president has abused his power. Day 1: Rep. Adam Schiff (Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, D-CA): Opening the hearing, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) made clear what he saw as the purpose of the impeachment investigation: “If we find that the President of theRead More →

Whether it’s love, hate, or sadness, Valentine’s Day is sure to rile strong emotions in individuals annually. Couples might spend a day finding out exactly why they love each other over a nice dinner, while single men and women might find solace in a carton of Ben and Jerrys. Couples that have been married for years could hate feeling obliged to buy something for their significant other every Valentines, while other people might yearn for a loving letter or card each Feb. 14. On the popular subreddit, AskReddit, users were asked the question “How do you ACTUALLY feel about Valentines day?” The most popular postRead More →

The 2018 year has been a roller-coaster, having its fair share of good and bad moments. Movies were the same; however, how many of those movies left viewers full of thrills? I will discuss my opinion in 3 categories: good movies, OK movies and terrible movies. A golden star next to the title indicates the winner that was either the best, OK or the Worst of that category. I like to think that I’m a positive person, so I will start with the best first. Best of 2018 “Halloween” Trailer for Halloween “Halloween” was one of my favorites this year since I am such aRead More →

The Politics in Pieces column is by editor Christian DeWeese The 2018 midterms have been hyped up since November 9, 2016, with some hoping for a “blue wave” and others wanting a continued Republican majority. While governor and congressional races are getting the majority of people’s attention, what about the literal other side of the ballot (the side we usually know hardly anything about)? This year, the measures on that other side include opportunities for voters to directly have a say in some important new laws. On Nov. 6, Oregon voters will vote on six key of state and county measures related to everything fromRead More →

The reputedly most unpopular Supreme Court nominee in 31 years was just confirmed to the court that decides important cases such as Roe v. Wade, marriage rights, and citizenship rights. If you’re among most people who don’t know who Brett Kavanaugh is or the fight over his nomination, read the next three paragraphs. Or if you’re like me and follow the news almost religiously, skip to the conclusion for my opinion and let’s see if we disagree or not. After a nearly three month contentious and partisan nomination process, Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed on Oct. 6 as the newest associate justice of the United StatesRead More →

My name is Madisyn Ashcraft, and I’m a huge movie buff and a horror geek. I’ve been watching movies ever since I was a kid but started to really acknowledge and appreciate films about three years ago. As for Horror, I watched my first R rated film at the age of five and ever since I’ve been hooked. Here at my column Horror Galore and Much More I will discuss my opinions about my favorite genre as well as exploring other genres. I will also investigate the opinions of others. There will be horror and much more. Halloween isn’t just a holiday for me, it’sRead More →

Oregon voters voted Tuesday, May 15, in one of the nation’s first primaries. Positions on the ballot included everything from governor, federal representatives, state representatives and senators, to county commissioners and judicial candidates. As Oregon moves on from the primaries to the general election in November, what’s next? Historically, the turnout rate of this month’s primary was the lowest in decades. According to the Secretary of State’s official results, only 891,441 ballots had been received of the 2,665,029 eligible voters or 33.45 percent. In the race for governor, incumbent Kate Brown easily won the Democratic primary with roughly 82 percent of the vote. On theRead More →

In this edition of (Para)Legally Laughable first year paralegal student Charles Crosier laughs at, and answers, a question. This is an opinion piece and does not reflect the views of The Mainstream. An opinion written recently by Han A. Von Spakovsky, first appearing on Fox News’ website and later on The Heritage Foundation website, asks a very interesting question with its title: “Is Robert Mueller Going to Investigate George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Andrew Jackson, Too?” To start on an even level Spakovsky’s article has to be boiled down to its point. He argues that the president has prosecutorial authority which he says, “… holdsRead More →