The country has found yet another issue to become divided over, but this time it’s caused by … a razor commercial? The recent #MeToo commercial, released on YouTube, Jan. 13, 2019, from the razor brand company Gillette, sparked controversy for consumers, particularly in men. The razor ad challenges toxic masculinity and calls out sexual harassment and bullying, asking the question: “Is this the best a man can get?” The campaign asked men to be more accountable for other men and their behavior. In the video description on YouTube for the razor ad, called “We Believe: The Best Men Can Be,” Gillette states, “Bullying. Harassment. IsRead More →

Dane Zahner, an HIV Alliance prevention and education manager, and Rachel Nedwick of the HIV Alliance on Monday, Feb. 4 taught students about Oregon’s HIV and hepatitis C programs and prevention strategies. Zahner defined the human immunodeficiency virus. “It is a deadly disease that will kill you and make you very sick. It’s not only a disease; it’s a powerful virus.” He also reminded how HIV is transferred. “A lot of people get HIV/AIDS from having sex with different people such as bi-sexual, gay, transgender partners or any men or women with unprotected sex or without a condom,” he said. “Unprotected sex is not safeRead More →

As a college student, you will eventually feel crushed underneath the workload of tuition, assignments, studying, grades, and all your responsibilities. Taking care of yourself tends to be forgotten. But self-care may be the difference between your passing or failing both as a student and as a human. Haley Cummings in a Collegiate Times article explains, “Self-care means taking time to improve mental, emotional and physical health.” Crucial steps to self-health is knowing yourself. Take the time to recognize the things that bring you joy and define you as a person, she suggets. The American Psychological Association illustrates the risks of unresolved stress. There isRead More →

Douglas County has an alarming problem with domestic abuse, stalking, and sexual assault. In one recent year alone, according to the Department of Human Services, the county called in domestic violent reports 2,316 times. The county also reported 27 instances of stalking and 161 calls of sexual assault. UCC’s Veronica Joyce is trying to reduce these crimes and help the people hidden behind the numbers. As part of her efforts, she is putting on “A Window Between Worlds:” A Kiss is Not a Promise” Monday, Feb. 11 and Wednesday, Feb. 13 from 10:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. in the Student Center. “Everybody has different boundaries,Read More →

Student press freedom day is today, January 30. The first amendment gives us the right of freedom of speech.  Press freedom day is to remind us that students often times get censored by administrators who are more worried about their image than by what is important. These administrators do not want students to write about topics that their peers and community should know about.   Student press freedom day is trying to put a stop to that.  The Oregon Student Free Expression law protects student journalists from this type of administrative censorship, allowing them to write what is important to them and what they thinkRead More →

For someone who is stalked, the fear doesn’t end at the front door. It often continues in nightmares; for example, a married woman having a peaceful night’s rest is woken up, not by her husband, but by the dark eyes of a stalker, and the once empty home is now invaded with no signs of help.  Another  woman goes to a convention, hoping for a good time. The last thing she expects is a stalker, but that is exactly what she gets. A man follows her all night, watching her like a statue. He even asks to drive her home. She declines. Once she isRead More →

Due to a commitment to provide academic opportunities to all Americans, Congress has created assistance for low-income and/or first-generation college students to help them successfully complete community college in order to transfer to a University. At UCC, that program is called TOP or TRiO. “The TRIO: Student Support Service Transfer Opportunity Program, is a program designed to help students transfer from the community college level to the university level and serve low-income, first generation, or students experiencing a disability, and help them through the whole process,” says Les Rogers, the director of the Transfer Opportunity Program. The program, known affectionately as TOP, is 100 percentRead More →

College is hard enough as it is, from paying for books, getting to class on time, to just trying to balance life and a higher education. But what if, on top of all that, students also had psychological issues, and what if they didn’t even know they had these psychological issues, and even more distressing what if they didn’t do anything to cause these issues. For at least 64 percent of the general population this suffering is real, according to the Center for Disease Control.  According to the Center for Disease Control, or CDC, over half of the population suffer effects from Adverse Childhood Experiences,Read More →

After 15 years of teaching a wide variety of speech, communication, and gender classes here, associate professor Paula Usrey plans to retire at the end of fall term. “I will miss the students that I see grow and share so much (I learn so much from students), and I get so excited and there’s nothing more rewarding than to see students start from one place and taking those steps to work hard and end in a different place. I will also miss the interactions with my colleagues and friends. You think you’re going to see some people, but you usually don’t,” Usrey said. Usrey expressedRead More →

Finding time to get scholarships, volunteering, or working can be hard during the school year, but winter break is right around the corner. Taking advantage of the break is a way to get important things done that might seem impossible during school.   Work on scholarships Some scholarships require a lot of time. Time to volunteer or to write an essay. Doing this during school hours can be hard, and almost any advisor will tell students to do this during the break. Grades are so much more important than applying for scholarships. Especially those that require a ton of time. OSAC requires looking through 60Read More →

Headline: Student participation in college planning less than needed, something UCC‘s College Council hopes to change Few students know what UCC’s College Council is, let alone how to access it.  But they should because the council helps the study body know about coming issues, such as possible tuition and fee raises. For students to understand College Council they must know its main purpose for existing. College Council is  “a primary recommending body reporting to the president regarding governance, policy, and inter campus relations. A key role for the council is to determine the best manner of communication for policy changes,” according to Vincent Yip, a CollegeRead More →

As winter approaches, university transfer application due dates draw nearer. Submitting applications as early as possible is helpful in the admissions process, especially if the school has rolling admissions (processing applications in the order they arrive). Getting familiar with websites such as Common Application and Coalition will help make the process go more smoothly. Common Application and Coalition are one-stop shops for applying to college. Both sites help coordinate applicants, applications, all universities the applicant wants to apply to, and recommendations. These websites are designed so that information only has to be filled in once for all chosen schools. It allows applicants to view dueRead More →