After 15 years of teaching a wide variety of speech, communication, and gender classes here, associate professor Paula Usrey plans to retire at the end of fall term. “I will miss the students that I see grow and share so much (I learn so much from students), and I get so excited and there’s nothing more rewarding than to see students start from one place and taking those steps to work hard and end in a different place. I will also miss the interactions with my colleagues and friends. You think you’re going to see some people, but you usually don’t,” Usrey said. Usrey expressedRead More →

Finding time to get scholarships, volunteering, or working can be hard during the school year, but winter break is right around the corner. Taking advantage of the break is a way to get important things done that might seem impossible during school.   Work on scholarships Some scholarships require a lot of time. Time to volunteer or to write an essay. Doing this during school hours can be hard, and almost any advisor will tell students to do this during the break. Grades are so much more important than applying for scholarships. Especially those that require a ton of time. OSAC requires looking through 60Read More →

Headline: Student participation in college planning less than needed, something UCC‘s College Council hopes to change Few students know what UCC’s College Council is, let alone how to access it.  But they should because the council helps the study body know about coming issues, such as possible tuition and fee raises. For students to understand College Council they must know its main purpose for existing. College Council is  “a primary recommending body reporting to the president regarding governance, policy, and inter campus relations. A key role for the council is to determine the best manner of communication for policy changes,” according to Vincent Yip, a CollegeRead More →

As winter approaches, university transfer application due dates draw nearer. Submitting applications as early as possible is helpful in the admissions process, especially if the school has rolling admissions (processing applications in the order they arrive). Getting familiar with websites such as Common Application and Coalition will help make the process go more smoothly. Common Application and Coalition are one-stop shops for applying to college. Both sites help coordinate applicants, applications, all universities the applicant wants to apply to, and recommendations. These websites are designed so that information only has to be filled in once for all chosen schools. It allows applicants to view dueRead More →

This is first in a series about the college career cycle for a UCC student. For the 2018-19 academic year, the UCC Foundation awarded $473,710 in scholarship funds, part of which were raised at the annual Legacy Ball fundraiser. “It’s very rewarding to see students reach their educational goals,” Honey McNamara said. McNamara is UCC’s scholarship and donor relations coordinator. McNamara described what inspires her in her job. “The stories of our veteran students, homeless students, and students who have suffered great loss in their lifetimes are the most inspirational to me,” McNamara said. McNamara, is at the helm of UCC’s Office of Advancement asRead More →

Midterms mean study time and quizzes, but for the physics 104 general science course midterm was time for teamwork. Mick Davis, physics professor, assigned a midterm group project to build a functioning hydraulic arm out of cardboard and hot glue that could curl weight. To build the arms, the class used instructions from the textbook that Davis has been writing himself. Davis’s book has recently been featured in the first issue of the International Journal of Open Educational Resources.The textbook teaches physics principles through the functions of the human body relating to force, balance, torque, levers, and mechanics. The arm had to meet the sameRead More →

What can students do to help them get through the holiday season? From worrying about how to afford gifts for your family and friend, to struggling to prepare a Thanksgiving or Christmas feast, the holidays can be very stressful to many students who are also dealing with school. Planning your shopping ahead and finding the best deals can go a long way to keeping your wallet fatter. Rebecca Mutschler, a general studies student working to obtain her Associates of Arts Oregon Transfer degree, suggests prioritizing your time and commitments. While she thinks plenty of time should be spent relaxing with your family, you should takeRead More →

Students who are preparing Thanksgiving dinner for the first time need recipes that are easy to follow and accurate results. For generations, newspapers have provided recipes during the holiday season that any home cook can turn to when racking their brains for Thanksgiving dish ideas. It’s these top six that always stick around. Green Bean Casserole: The casserole, created in 1955 by Campbell’s, is a popular side dish made with green beans, cream of mushroom soup, and french fried onions. Some family recipes add cheese, bacon, or nutmeg to it as well. Here are some simple directions: In a 13×9 baking dish, mix one canRead More →

This year, the UCC Student Engagement/ASUCC Leadership team will be providing up to 75 Thanksgiving meal baskets to students with families in need. The Thanksgiving basket project began in 2010, starting with 25 baskets. In 2014, it increased to 50 baskets. “In 2015 we increased it to 75 in order to provide baskets to the students/families who were directly impacted by 10/1. We’ve kept it at 75 since then,” said Marjan Coester, Director of Student Engagement. Students can apply for a meal basket by filling out a short online application. ASUCC only requires that applicants be enrolled students with needs. However, preference will be givenRead More →

Stress hurts. No question. Students often fail to seek social support and human connection before allowing chronic stress and anxiety to drive them into isolation. The Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors, including directors from Oregon State University, published results from a 2013 study showing that anxiety is the top presenting concern among college students (41.6 percent), followed by depression (36.4 percent) and relationship problems (35.8 percent). College students’ mental health is a growing concern, the survey found. Whether students have chosen higher education to open doors, to begin a new dream career, to learn about a passion, or to seek overall lifestyleRead More →

The downtown Roseburg library will have a soft opening within the next few weeks, according to new Library Director Kris Wiley. The grand opening is planned for Jan. 10. The scheduled reopening will bring an end to a year and a half closure for the library, which was previously the heart of an 11-branch library system run by the Douglas County government. Those libraries closed due to funding difficulties after voters rejected a proposed countywide library district tax in November of 2016. Delays to a previously planned fall opening were related to construction remodeling. Soon the library will be open 30 hours a week fromRead More →

Since its inception in 1991, the card game “Magic: The Gathering” has generated a huge buzz that influences many other games and has amassed over 12 million players worldwide, including a group at UCC. UCC’s MTG players congregate in the student center to play daily. They came from high schools in Sutherlin, Roseburg and Myrtle Creek which also had niche groups who regularly played the game. One student even started playing back in middle school. One of the appeals of the game is that there’s always something to learn. “I enjoy the tactics and the strategy; it’s a tactical game,” said Scarlet who plays atRead More →

Art professor Susan Rochester’s project, set to begin showing at The Art Gallery on Wednesday, Oct. 31, was created by taking geological and satellite photos of land along the U.S. Mexican border and weaving them into a collage. The visual information in her work announces rising conflicts along the southern border of the United States. Part of Rochester’s art analyzes border patrol practices such as stopping historical visits between ancient villages and increasing danger for families in transit. Traveling to many different cultures and being introduced to historic weavings inspired Rochester to create her series of collages. Using borrowed images from Google Earth, she wasRead More →