cafeteria prices

Cafeteria Prices Have Students Confused

in Campus Life by

The cafeteria has become quieter lately and lines are shorter than last year. Prices may have something to do with that.

Loggers has a two year contract with UCC to run the cafeteria which has several best-selling items: the pizza & pinwheels, breakfast burrito, bacon cheeseburger, rice bowls, breakfast sandwich, the salad bar and boneless wings.

However, complaints have been levied, mainly against the prices. “The cafeteria, in my eyes, is overpriced,” Jenica Lamoreaux, a UCC student, said. “So I try to pack my own lunch or find a cheaper option.”

Lamoreaux is not the only student who is concerned. “Our budget doesn’t allow us to buy a $6 sandwich everyday,” Jamie Glen, a communications student, said. “Maybe if they had a regular cafeteria and then Loggers as another option.”

Another concern has been that prices are not clearly marked. “I asked how much is the pizza, and the girl behind the counter said ‘I don’t know.” Someone in line behind me said $6,’” Eric Percell, a welding student, said. Percell is also concerned about pricing inconsistency. “At the restaurant a personal pizza sells for $3.50, but here it sells for $6.”

Percell complained that two 20 ounce Mountain Dews, a small tater tots and one sandwich totaled $10.

Sam Gross, owner of Loggers, has said a conscious effort has gone into keeping the food prices lowered for a student’s budget. Nothing on the menu exceeds $6, according to Gross.

“Prices are similar to a lot of items available last year,” Gross said. “That being said, we are continuing to evaluate sales and see where we can make changes. We are also working on getting EBT as a payment option.”

As with any flourishing business, the kinks and specifics are still being worked out, all with the goal of aiding college students looking for a quick meal. “We want to stay flexible as to meet the needs of the students and staff,” Gross said. “We welcome feedback.”

Over the fall term, Gross hopes for a gradual increase in profits. “It is too early to tell, but a typical restaurant has profits of five percent,” Gross said. “Our food costs are higher than a typical restaurant so that we can keep prices low.”

Gross has had previous experience with UCC. Gross helped several UCC fund raisers, including last year’s Looking Glass and Kris Yates funds. He has also supplied his Loggers Tap House restaurant for several UCC events and study sessions.

Loggers applied for the cafeteria bid at the beginning of September, according to Gross. Upon winning, the former cafeteria was turned into the Loggers Café. The café opened on Sept. 28, the first day of school and is open Monday through Friday, from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.