The Tom Keel Fitness Center is used for fitness classes and team training but can also be used for personal workouts. The Center includes a wide variety of stationary machines and aerobic equipment such as treadmills and ellipticals; however, it is lacking in the area of free weights. “We are really looking to modernize,” said former UCC basketball coach and current professor Rod Snook. “All of our power lifting equipment, our squat rack, and benches etc.., are all getting old and outdated so we really want to improve the overall standing of the fitness center. At the moment Tom Keel only has two flat benches,Read More →

UCC women’s basketball wrapped up their 2017-18 regular season in a familiar fashion, taking on Clark Community College at home on Saturday, March 3. UCC bullied their way past Clark by a final score of 96-57. The victory marked the Hawk’s 28th win this season, with the team hungry for more as they prepared for their next challenge, the 2018 NWAC Basketball Tournament. After last year’s tough finish, Coach Dave Stricklin was ready; “I am excited [for the tournament]; this is a special group, and the past two years have been great,” Stricklin said. Coach Stricklin and his team wrapped up the season tied forRead More →

Enrollment numbers are very important for the health UCC’s budget. “The more students we have the more revenue the college generates to support expenses and operations,” said Natalya Brown, director of accounting and finance. Aside from the athletic department adding new sports teams to bring in additional students, the enrollment services department is also doing their part to try and make enrolling into UCC as easy as possible. Missy Olson, director of college transitions and enrollment management, is attempting strategic enrollment planning (SEP). As she explained in a presentation to UCC’s Board of Education she said, “SEP refers to a complex and organized effort toRead More →

In January 2018, Umpqua Community College announced an addition of three new sports programs (men’s and women’s track and field and baseball). These new teams were added in an attempt to boost UCC’s enrollment. Athletic Director Craig Jackson stated that new teams are “enrollment driven”, and the goal is to use the teams to bring in additional students to UCC. Over the past five years, UCC’s enrollment has been on the decline. In the 2011-2012 school year, enrollment exceeded 4,000 students. During the 2016-2017 school year, UCC was struggling with less than 3,000 students enrolled. As of March 7 2018, Roseburg’s High School had 1,502Read More →

Cindy Haws’s Biology class traveled to the Lower Cow Creek Watershed area near Riddle Friday, March 2 to view the impact of the logged landscape and the use of variable retention regeneration harvesting at the 2015 and 2017 Douglas Complex and Horse Prairie fire locations. The purpose of the trip was to analyze the Bureau of Land Management’s oversight of the lands. The field trip lab taught that variable retention regeneration harvesting is a timber harvest method that retains structures, organisms and conditions from the pre-harvest stand for incorporation into the post-harvest ecosystem with the goal of establishing complex early-seral forest conditions through the regenerationRead More →

Signs at convenience stores and shops such as Center Market until recently had been displaying the words: Kratom Sold Here. Sunstone Organics, a company located in Pleasant Hill, Oregon founded by kratom users provides local shops with their product. Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa), a botanical substance with uses varying across cultures, up until February was being sold to help overcome opioid addiction when the FDA shut it down by classifying it as an opioid. The FDA made this classification due to the chemical structure similarities kratom shares with other controlled opioids and the 44 reported deaths associated with kratom use, although the majority of the casesRead More →

Being a student attending courses on campus can be hard. For students who also have a child, finding child care makes that job much more difficult. One option on campus is the Ford Childhood Enrichment Center. This facility offers support for parents and provides educational programs for children. The Center also provides hands-on experience for college students entering a child development field. The Center requires appropriate background checks for their workers. However, according to the UCC website, they only take children between the ages of 6 weeks and 5 years. Students who have children outside of the Center’s age requirements must find care elsewhere. TheRead More →

Last month’s shooting in Parkland, Florida was set to be like all the others: another heartbreaking event in a long series of heartbreaking events. But in this past month following the tragedy, the rather unthinkable has happened: corporations are taking the initiative to reduce school shootings instead of the politicians who have been tasked to protect us. Two weeks following the shooting, Dick’s Sporting Goods became the first retailer to change its policies. It no longer sells assault-rifles, high capacity magazines, or guns of any kind to persons under 21. Hours later, Walmart and Fred Meyer (through its owner Kroger) made similar policy changes. InRead More →

Spring break offers a buffet of poor choices. Drinking, drugs, and unprotected sex present persistent temptations. “Someone is killed every 31 minutes in a drunk driving accident during normal times; during spring break, those numbers increase by as much as 23 percent,” Wagner Reese, an Indianapolis Attorney, said. Staying safe during spring break can not only protect oneself but also friends and strangers, especially where alcohol is involved. “If drinking alcohol is part of your break, remember that it can impair your judgment and actions,” the Center for Disease Control said. “Don’t drink and drive. There are plenty of non-alcoholic alternatives.” Knowing what to doRead More →

According to UCC’s Student Self Serve, the average annual cost of attendance for a full time student totals at $11,664. Compared to the $27,502 cost of attendance most four-year colleges have, community college presents an opportunity to run the same race without paying an arm and a leg. That being said, money is still a huge obstacle for many students on campus. Although ASUCC provides resources like gas cards, food, backpacks and even rides to and from campus, some students struggle with homelessness on top of work and academic responsibilities. Filling out scholarships and other financial aid can help relieve stress and potentially pay forRead More →

Wake up, study. . . study. . . more studying. . . crying. . . and if one is lucky enough, a little bit of sleep, then wake up, repeat. This is a common schedule for the typical student preparing for final exams. All over the country, finals week is coming up, whether students are prepared for it or not. Instead of stressing out and shutting down, students can take some easy steps to lighten the weight that finals (and their backpacks) are putting on them. “Remember to give yourself healthy breaks during studying for finals, as it can easily become overwhelming quickly. I’ve foundRead More →

Free money. College students will surely be interested now. Students are applying for scholarships all year long. The OSAC Scholarship just closed this past Thursday, March 1st. There are several other scholarships that are still open and should be taken advantage of. Most scholarships have an essay portion of sorts. They also may have a volunteer chart that needs to be filled out. These volunteer charts are a good indicator of how involved the applicant is in their communities and what their interests are. Finding places or groups to volunteer with isn’t always easy, but researching and having the right resources can lead one toRead More →

Umpqua Community College forestry student Wade Christensen was aware as a child that he wanted to join the military; his family knew he’d likely make it his career. They were right. He served 23 years in the Army, and 18 of those years were spent in Special Forces as a Green Beret. “My dad was a Vietnam vet,” said Christensen, “I think I saw his old duffle bag when I was probably in first or second grade.” Family members of Christensen had a sense of his future career before he knew it himself. In spite of the military’s attraction to Christensen, he initially planned onRead More →