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The year is 1989. The United States’ women’s wrestling team is competing for the first time at the world championships in Switzerland. Asia DeWeese, UCC’s new wrestling coach, is there earning what she calls “my greatest achievement.” “I was part of the first women’s national team that went to world championships,” DeWeese says.  In a time when “USA wrestling didn’t want us” and when their team “didn’t get any money,” she and her teammates were competing against the odds. In spite of the odds, coach DeWeese won second at the 1989 world championships, her biggest wrestling accolade. DeWeese wasn’t always respected, however. When she wasRead More →

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Life must be easy being a college athlete. Student athletes have all the friends, they receive all the glory and attention from playing a great game and some might have better relationships with professors because they’re athletes. They go to school for free because of their scholarships — at least that’s the stereotype. And, the stereotype is that student athletes get away with whatever they want. They don’t have to dedicate themselves to anything except their individual sport; they avoid all the responsibility. Contrary to this ridiculous stereotype, the truth is that it takes an incredibly dedicated and motivated person to be a college athlete.Read More →

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Since then, annually, including 2017, the POTUS has proclaimed April Sexual Assault Awareness Month. On March 31, Trump officially acknowledged that April, 2017, would continue to be proclaimed Sexual Assault Awareness Month. “My Administration, including the Department of Justice and the Department of Health and Human Services, will do everything in its power to protect women, children, and men from sexual violence,” Trump said. Any UCC student who needs immediate assistance regarding this topic can contact security at 541-440-7777. Otherwise students or staff can contact Lynn Johnson in HR located In the Student Center or reach her by phone at 541-440-7690. The book “We BelieveRead More →

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Shooting landscapes: the good, bad and ugly Landscape shooting can be somewhat difficult, but the trick is in setting up the right composition. Some of the best moments on camera take a lot of time and patience, but the payoff is really great. First ask yourself these questions:   What am I shooting? Whether it’s a large mountain range, animals, or a river bed, knowing what you are shooting will help you map out the composition. Look for a focal point and put that focal point on one of the lines that intersect if you divide the view finder into thirds.   Changing perspectives: SometimesRead More →

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Annie E. Clark and Andrea L. Pino, who both suffered sexual assault at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, helped spearhead federal investigation into campus crime when they filed a federal complaint against UNC for mishandling sexual assault. Working from their experiences, the two have created a book We Believe You: Survivors of Campus Sexual Assault Speak Out. Clark and Pino were also featured in the highly recommended The Hunting Ground documentary which also analyzes sexual assault on college campuses. As one Good Reads reviewer says, “With documentaries such as ‘The Hunting Ground’ and books such as ‘We Believe You,’ we are finallyRead More →

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APRIL 11—The Pacific Fisheries Management Council decided to officially close both commercial and sport fishing for Chinook and Coho salmon along approximately 200 miles of the southern Oregon and northern California coasts for the remainder of 2017. According to the Pacific Fisheries Management Council ‘s website: “Fisheries from the Florence South Jetty to Horse Mountain, California vwill be closed for the entire season to reduce impacts on Klamath River fall Chinook.” This closure primarily affects coastal waters from Florence to Horse Mountain, not inland rivers in Oregon. “Inland, spring-run Chinook fishing will still be allowed through Aug. 14 on the Klamath River and through Aug.Read More →

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Thoughts and comments typed onto pink, squared sheets of paper sit pinned alongside their companion drawings on three walls in the Whipple Fine Arts building. These pink sheets of paper share an anonymous Tumblr artist’s and her followers’ struggles, feelings and even secrets as they search together for comfort through art. Throughout this spring term, from April 3 to May 1, The Art Gallery at UCC is displaying art work from Ambivalently Yours, the anonymous Tumblr artist, that is eponymously titled, “Ambivalently Yours: as seen on Tumblr.” The show will be open to the public Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. asRead More →

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A political column analyzing contemporary U.S. culture Since the 2016 U.S. presidential election, many Americans have become so electrified by the results that they are shouting, crying, and fighting … often against their friends, family and neighbors . . . at the cost of listening, learning, and loving. Dialogue is turning into broken friendships. Free speech is starting riots. Marches are taking over the streets. That may be acceptable to the disenfranchised, but when we break long-standing friendships, when citizens call to arms to shoot protesters, have we gone too far? United we stand. Divided we fall. Dissension is nothing new to the U.S. WeRead More →

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Starting this summer, a 12 credit student might expect to pay an additional $36 in tuition and fees per term. An increase of $3 per credit was a unanimous, though tentative, decision reached by the UCC Board of Trustees on Wednesday, April 12. A second reading of the tuition increase will be required at the April 26 board meeting before it can be voted in or voted out. The first April board meeting focused primarily on what can be done to rectify a $1.4 million shortfall and included discussion on the proposed increase in tuition and fees for students. Along with Oregon’s forecast $1.7 billionRead More →

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Four students from Umpqua Community College’s Alpha Sigma Upsilon, which is UCC’s chapter of the Rocky Mountain Cascade region of the international Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) nation, attended the first annual Catalyst Awards convention. And it was, for them, quite an experience. President Jantyne Bunce, Vice President KC Perley, Adviser Diana Kelly, Honors in Action Officer Tanya Williams and Hanya Vargas made the long journey to Nashville, Tennessee to represent UCC. “Our team returned catalyzed,” Perley said. “We laughed, learned and cried together, and in the end, we came back to our chapter to finish out the year and be a catalyst for next years’Read More →

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All Jennifer Hagerty ever wanted was to help others succeed in life. After years of neglect and abuse from her parents, Hagerty wanted to treat others differently than how she was treated. As a result, nursing became her lifelong passion. “My dad left when I was four and never came back. My mom faced addiction when I was a young child. The best way I know how to describe it is that they loved the high more than they loved themselves and more than anything else in this world,” she said. That’s why nursing provided her “the opportunity to have an impact without having toRead More →

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Editor’s Note: This is the first in a series about academic cheating. What do the New England Patriots, former president Bill Clinton and students have in common? All three have been accused of cheating at one time or another. Whether unfair or dishonest methods are used to win a football game, to advance a political means or to get better grades in a class, the accusation of cheating  does  not  affect  just the accused. And the ramifications can be far reaching. Loss of employment, opportunities in academic programs, integrity and reputation are only a few of the potential impacts accusations can have. Unfortunately, the actRead More →